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"Don'ts" For Displaying The U.S. Flag

Air Force Protocol
from 'Til Wheels are Up'

"DON'TS" FOR DISPLAYING THE U.S. FLAG

The flag should not be displayed on days when the weather is inclement, except when an all-weather flag is displayed.

The flag should not be displayed on a float in a parade except from a staff.

The flag should not be draped over the hood, top, sides, or back of a vehicle or of a railroad train or a boat.

The flag should never be displayed with the union down, except as a signal of dire distress in instances of extreme danger to life or property.

The flag should never touch anything beneath it, such as the ground, floor, water, or merchandise.

The flag should never be used as wearing apparel, bedding, or drapery. It should never be festooned, drawn back, nor up, in folds, but always allowed to fall free. Bunting of blue, white, and red, always arranged with the blue above, the white in the middle, and the red below, should be used for covering a speaker's desk, draping the front of the platform, and for decoration in general.

The flag should never be carried flat or horizontally, but always aloft and free.

The flag should never be fastened, displayed, used, or stored in such a manner as to permit it to be easily torn, soiled, or damaged in any way.

The flag should never be used as a covering for a ceiling.

The flag should never be placed upon it, nor on any part of it, nor attached to it any mark, insignia, letter, word, figure, design, picture, or drawing of any nature.

The flag should never be used as a receptacle for receiving, holding, carrying, or delivering anything.

The flag should never be used for advertising purposes in any manner whatsoever. It should not be embroidered on such articles as cushions or handkerchiefs and the like, printed or otherwise impressed on paper napkins or boxes or anything that is designed for temporary use and discord. Advertising signs should not be fastened to a staff or halyard from which the flag is flown.

No part of the flag should ever be used as a custom or athletic uniform. However, a flag patch may be affixed to the uniform of military personnel, firemen, policeman, and members of patriotic organizations. The flag represents a living country and is itself considered a living thing. Therefore, the lapel flag pin, being a replica, should be worn on the left lapel near the heart.

No other flag or pennants should be placed above or, if on the same level, to the right of the U.S. flag, except during church services conducted by a naval chaplain aboard a U.S. naval vessel at sea or ashore, when the church pennant may be flown above the flag during church services for the personnel of the Navy.

The flag should form a distinctive feature of the ceremony of unveiling a statue or monument, but it should never be used as the covering for the statue or monument.



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